Fandom in the Social Media Age – The Numbers, Part Two

In the last post I went through the numbers associated with The100Writers Tumblr account. This time we’ll take a look at Instagram and Vine (shorter discussions) and then Twitter, for which I have charts out the wazoo.

I created an Instagram account for The100Writers on 11/18/14. As of my last day on 1/23/15 there were 514 followers of the account. I fed photos from Instagram to the Tumblr account, which in turn posts to Twitter. Unfortunately, I never really had time to take photos to feed in, so I only used this account 7 times (for 7 photos). Still, in that time a photo of the memorial wall got 176 likes in December, when we had half as many followers. It’s hard to draw many conclusions, but given that the account was only running for two months, I believe we could have gone further with the usage of the account. The official CW_The100 account routinely gets over 2,000 likes per photo. Again, I struggled to find any other writers rooms on Instagram. Not saying they aren’t there, I just couldn’t find them.

Vine was also something I dove into fairly late in the season. I had this idea that we could have fans post Vine videos of their reactions to scenes or to explain why they love the show. I also saw that Law & Order: SVU ‘s Writers’ Room was on Vine, which gave me courage to give the platform a try. This led to some surprising findings…

As of my last day of work, we had nearly 2,000 followers on Vine. We posted exactly one video on 11/5/14, the day we opened the Vine account. That 15 second video played over 19,000 ‘loops’, got 160 likes and ‘revined’ 48 times. In comparison, SVUWritersRoom Vine videos ranged from 2,000 to 33,00 loops over 64 posts for a total of 321,416 loops — most of them landing around 3500-4000 loops each. That account has 1,983 followers, virtually the exact same number of followers The100Writers account has. Further, the SVUWritersRoom appears to have created their account sometime in August (although, it could be August 2013, given that there are “November” vines preceding ‘September’ vines. They may have had a dormant account created much earlier that got most of its use in 2014).

I think it is safe to say that the SVU demographic is far different than ours. It’s impossible to draw many conclusions, because we only posted one vine video, but given that we got 19k loops out of that one, it’s possible more videos = more loops = more followers.

One bit of perspective: The top vine accounts generate MILLIONS of loops per video. So, we weren’t exactly playing with the big boys here. Same with Instagram.

Now… onto TWITTER.

The100Writers Twitter Followers

The100Writers Twitter Followers

The black box indicates the date I took over running the account. 3,201 followers prior to that date — not bad for a show that premiered on March 19, exactly two months earlier. The account really takes off with followers right around October, as the show premiered for its second season on 10/22, and just kept climbing. As you can see here there were 30,433 followers as of 1/20/15. I just check the account for today (1/29) and it’s already at 33,256 — almost a pickup of 3,000 fans in 9 days. The account has been used for retweeting the main The 100 account and livetweeting the new episode, so its still in use, though significantly less since I left on 1/23. Still, the fact that the account is picking up nearly 3,000 followers a week indicates that the existing fanbase is finding the account to follow it and/or new fans are finding the show and then following the account. Given the anecdotal evidence I’ve seen, it is a lot of the latter.

If you have a twitter account, you might have fun with the free analytics tools provided by Twitter — The drawback is that the data set tends to be limited to the last 3 months, so I couldn’t get a full picture of the entire life of the account, but here are some stats I find fascinating:

Who are our followers?

Who are our followers?

There’s a lot to look at here, but the main areas that interested me were the locations of our fans and ‘unique interests’ — Clearly those who like drama and sci-fi follow the account. I wasn’t expecting to see that the Top Interests of our fans is… Music. It makes sense though. So many young people are plugged into the musicians who really use Twitter well — Taylor Swift among them, so it follows that would be a top interest for them.

The location data is even more fascinating. Clearly the US is a big chunk of our audience, but look at the UK! The UK is almost as large as the US — anecdotally I can say this is completely true. I got more requests from UK fans to livetweet their episodes than I ever expected. Unfortunately those mid-day tweets for the US fans were sometimes confusing, but the UK fans loved it. The show is a big hit in the UK, and one thing I don’t think writers rooms do particularly well is think globally. So many shows are sold to different countries, but we are so US-centric in our outreach that we forget those international fans who may be weeks or months behind. More than once I got “yelled at” to stop spoiling things for the UK — of course, I always gave spoiler warnings, but even innocuous tweets could contain spoilers for them! It certainly made me more mindful of our foreign fanbase. I will be talking about the international outreach efforts and trends in more detail later, but believe me, there’s a lot to talk about.

twitteranalytics1This is the chart I really wish I had more data for. This was the last 28 days of tweeting. Knowing how many overall impressions our account had over a much longer timeframe would be instructive, not least of which because the last 28 day time period included a 5-week long hiatus. You can see at the beginning of the chart how low the impressions numbers are — so few tweets were sent out and very little engagement. But as we came back from hiatus, the numbers spiked. That huge spike on January 6th correlates with the day we were back in the office and production had resumed on the final episode of the season. It is also the day that Season 2 premiered in the UK. The other large spike on the chart is when our Midseason premiere aired on January 22nd. I think it’s safe to infer that the impressions spiked in relation to those events.

analytics7The good news is I was able to pull a comparison chart from September, before the show premiered on 10/22. You can see the major difference in impressions while we were between seasons, in this month leading up to the return than in December, when the show was on hiatus and then returned.

I had some more charts regarding numbers of retweets, favorites and engagements we had, but honestly, I think this is enough data, save one more graph to get to the point.

I wanted to show a comparison of hashtag tweets for The 100 vs. Arrow and The Originals.  First, let’s look at how many followers each account has, both the “official” account and the writers’ room account for each show (as of 1/29/15):

Arrow CW Account                505, 800+ followers

The Arrow Writers’ Room      83,200+ f0llowers

The Originals CW Account     731,100+ followers

The Originals Writers’ Room  33,900+ followers

The 100 CW Account               68,900+ followers

The 100 Writers’ Room            33,200+ followers

As you can see, The100Writers has a much larger percentage of the official account’s followers than either Arrow or The Originals has.

Now, let’s look at the tweets with the “official” hashtag of each show…

Whole lot of tweetin' going on.

Whole lot of tweetin’ going on.

Surprisingly, The 100 had more tweets than The Originals in the same 30 day time period, though on show nights the tweets for the day of are virtually identical. Both pale in comparison to Arrow, which is our lead-in show.

Why did I choose The Originals and Arrow for comparisons? Let’s look at Nielsen ratings…

First, Arrow’s numbers. It’s in Season 3:

arrowratings

Arrow

 

Source: TVSeriesFinale.com

Next, The Originals, which is in Season 2:

The Originals

The Originals

Source: TVSeriesFinale.com

And finally, The 100 in Season 2:

The 100 Ratings

The 100 Ratings

Source: TVSeriesFinale.com

The Originals and The 100 have similar demo numbers, though The 100 tends to have a slightly larger audience number. Arrow is The 100’s lead-in, so it seemed right to use it for comparison as it almost consistently has 2x the audience of The 100.

What’s interesting is looking at the number of tweets generated for each show in comparison to its ratings and its followers on the official and writers’ room accounts. All three writers’ rooms did livetweets on the night their shows aired, and usually for both coasts. It’s staggering to see the vast number of followers the Arrow accounts have and yet the engagement in tweeting is about twice as much as The 100. You would think with the massive follower numbers, you’d see more tweets, but the number of tweets is consistent with the difference in ratings The Originals has a massive number of followers on the official CW account (which makes sense, because it is the spinoff for The Vampire Diaries which has over 1.2 million followers on its official account) but the engagement appears to be far lower, especially when you consider the percentage of Official account followers to the Writers’ Room account followers. If we assume that all followers of the writers’ room account also follow the official account, less than 5% follow both. In comparison, 48% of the Official The 100 account followers also follow the Writers’ Room account. And given the total number of followers for The Originals compared to The 100, for them to have virtually the same tweet rates on the hashtag that The 100 has indicates that the fanbase for The Originals is less engaged than The 100 fans.

One can even argue that The Originals should have more tweets than Arrow — I mean, just looking at the Official accounts, The Originals has 55% more followers than Arrow, yet it’s clear the engagement with the Writers’ Rooms is a completely different story — Arrow tops The Originals by 41% and The 100 by 40%.

So, what’s the conclusion? Well, those are yet to come. Stay tuned…

Posted under analysis

This post was written by Shawna on January 29, 2015

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Fandom in the Social Media Age – The Numbers, Part One

I love statistics. It was, unfortunately, one of my worst subjects when I was getting my B.S. in B.A., but I still love it.

Granted I won’t be doing any 538-style stats crunching here — I don’t have nearly enough data or data points to engage in a deep dive (and if I want them, I’d have to cough up money), but what I do have are raw numbers from which we start our discussion. Remembering, of course, that correlation does not equal causation — just because two sets of numbers correlate does not mean that one causes the other. This is important to remember, because there are so many other factors that go into why the numbers are the numbers.

The first number to talk about is the easiest, because it started at zero. Tumblr followers.

When I took over the reins of the writers’ assistant position on “The 100” there was no Tumblr account for the writers. In fact, with the exception of NBC’s Hannibal, which posts under the official show tumblr, there are NO WRITERS’ ROOMS ON TUMBLR. If there are, please tell me, because I looked. HARD. Given the demographics of the audience we are trying to reaching it’s actually shocking that more shows aren’t on Tumblr. It’s so easy to reblog fan art and gifsets and post official things like videos or reviews…even when doing the bare minimum in content, it’s a no brainer. Still, no one has ventured into this social media platform. Why?

That’s a question for another day. Today’s question is, how did it go for The 100 Writers’ Room?

From zero to 18k

From zero to 18k

I don’t have a huge basis for comparison, because on tumblr, you can’t see how many followers a blog has. It could have ten or ten thousand, and you’d never know. I’m told anecdotally that 18,000 followers is significant. This screen shot was taken on January 21, two days prior to my last day of work. The account averages anywhere from 100-1000 new followers A DAY, depending on the day. Since 1/21 when this screenshot was taken to today 1/27 it picked up another 900 followers and counting.

You can also see how many posts I contributed — 361 as of two days prior. I added a few more after that, so let’s round it out to 365. A post a day for a year, if we were averaging over a year, but we aren’t. We’re averaging over 8 months. And if we want to get really technical and take out the weekend days and only account for workdays we average over 2 posts a day, nearly 3.

Could I have done more? Most assuredly, but given that I had an actual job to do (taking notes in the writers’ room and, you know, assisting) 2-3 posts a day is pretty damn good for keeping up our presence. Many of those posts were questions I answered from the ask box and I did minimal reblogging — one thing I would change is I would seek out more fan art and quality gifsets and fan videos to reblog in the future.

18,000 accounts followed this one from the time the tumblr was created in June (it was not created on day one, but something I came to a few weeks after I started on the job) until now. Granted, it’s a tiny fraction of the fanbase, but let’s look at Tumblr’s stats on who that fanbase is:

According to an article published by Forbes on 9/27/13 Tumblr users are “a young, bright and tech-savvy group of international users who seek what might seem counterintuitive: Genuine online connection bolstered, not hindered, by anonymity.” Further:

The site has many of the social media trappings you would recognize: comment threads, up-votes, emoticons. But the nature of the language and iconography is decidedly gentler and the premise is unified around one key thing: support for people hurting.

According to Business Insider of 12/13 here are some demographic stats about Tumblr, including our first chart!

Teen Social Network Usage

Teen Social Network Usage

It’s a little blurry because I couldn’t save off the hi-res image that’s on their site (click the link above for a slightly better picture) but I’ll interpret for you:

Teens use tumblr more and for longer than they use Twitter, Facebook or Instagram.

So, if you are looking to reach an audience and that is your prime demographic for your show, Twitter isn’t necessarily the best vehicle. In fact, I saw many of our twitter followers actually tweet that they only got a twitter account to follow other accounts related to their favorite shows. Otherwise, they wouldn’t be there at all!

Now does that mean I’m saying you should get rid of twitter accounts… not at all! Here are a couple of stats from the article:

Tumblr is strong with teens and young adults interested in self-expression, but only 8% of U.S. Internet users with incomes above $75,000 use Tumblr.

Twitter has a surprisingly young user population for a large social network — 27% of 18 to 29-year-olds in the U.S. use Twitter, compared to only 16% of people in their thirties and forties.

Instagram is very female-oriented. Sixty-eight percent of Instagram’s users are women.

I highly recommend you check out that link to BI if you are a total data junkie because the charts and graphs they have on this… just heaven. Sadly, it’s only a two-week free trial to access the graphs, but TOTALLY WORTH IT.

We’ll get to the Instagram and Twitter stats in another post. One of the primary metrics of Tumblr is the reblogs and likes. It’s easy to like a post and super easy to reblog it. Creating content that gets reblogged is key.

Our most reblogged post was a “Script to Screen” from Episode 5 of Season 2 of the infamous “#Bellarke Hug” — it currently has 1,984 notes. Without a point of reference it seems meaningless. Look, we didn’t do Taylor Swift blog post reblog/notes numbers — And we see posts all the time with hundreds of thousands of notes, so just under 2k on one post, isn’t that great. But beyond the number is the conversation it generated in OTHER blog posts. Unfortunately, that’s not a quantifiable number, and we’ll have to save the anecdotal evidence for a later post.

If I could produce a chart for our Tumblr follower trends, it would look a little something like this:

tumblr followers

The numbers here are approximate for each month, save two milestones which were called out in posts. On December 4th, we hit 10, 775 followers. On January 21, we hit 18,000 followers and that number continues to grow without me managing it at all.

There were two huge spikes of followers, first in October/November when the season premiere aired on October 22 and also at the end of December. Over the Christmas holiday break I actually watched as our follower numbers climbed and climbed over a 72 hour period — more than 4,000 new followers gained in that time frame alone. It was insane, and I still don’t understand what spurred the huge follower count in such a short span AND when we weren’t airing or publishing much content. One hypothesis was that young people were out of school and on tumblr passing time and found our feed and started following, but that is still a stunning amount for 3 days!

Again, we’re not here to draw conclusions (yet). These are just the numbers.

And there’s more to come: Twitter, Instagram and Vine.

Posted under analysis

This post was written by Shawna on January 27, 2015

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Fandom in the Social Media Age – Preface

The last seven months of my life have been a whirlwind — I didn’t really blog it before (but most of you already know, so why bother) but I finally got into the writers’ room of a TV show (see last post). The show in question was The CW’s “The 100”, a post-apocalyptic “teen” sci-fi show that is more than you would think it is from just viewing the pilot. The show got a second season based on the fairly strong ratings during its midseason premiere last year, and it now has an early renewal for season 3.

The fanbase for the show has gradually grown all year, and I got a front row seat to the groundswell. Every person who found the show on Netflix, once the first season hit there in October would tweet or post about how they “discovered” this show they’d never heard of, and once you got past the pilot, wow, was it great. Young girls, young guys, older women, and yes, even a few older guys have found the show and have been building a fandom brick by brick.

While that was happening, I was put in charge of the social media presence for the writers’ room of the show, which already had a twitter account with about 3000 followers when I took over on May 19, 2014. I took a snapshot on my last day in the office, the last official day of production on Season 2 which was January 23, 2014.

You might not know it, but I was a business student long ago, and so I love to do deep dives into data points and analytics when the opportunity presents itself (which, let’s face it, screenwriting doesn’t really call for, so I don’t get a lot of chances to play in that sandbox)

Over the next few posts I’ll be dissecting my lessons learned from running the social media for a TV show’s writers’ room — what worked well, what didn’t. And what the changing face of fandom means for TV writers and even more significantly what the “new normal” of interface and engagement between show creators/writers and the fans means long-term for everyone.

Consider this the preface. The warning. Now you know what’s coming. Strap in. There’s so much to discuss…

Posted under analysis, writing

This post was written by Shawna on January 25, 2015

Over the Wall

It would seem this blog exists in some kind of bubble, which I only manage to pierce in January and then never again return inside until the next time January rolls around…

Hello friends, old and new… here we are again. A new year, a new blog post. It’s how we roll around here.

So, how was 2014? Some bad? Some good? A little bit of both.

I took a quick look at my ‘new year’ post last year at this time and my goal was to get “over the wall” and into a TV writers’ room. I was smart not to specify whether that would be as a staffed writer or as an assistant. Hedging my bets is always wise.

Well, I did it. I got over the wall! As an honest to God TV Writers’ Assistant.

So, on that score, 2014 was pretty good. Mission accomplished!

But of course, that wasn’t my only goal. You don’t know me very well if you thought it was. No, no… I always have far grander goals… like, get hired to write something for money! Pitch a show, maybe even sell a show! Get into the WGA!

We did get hired for one project in February, which then never materialized. That was a major bummer. Then we got more general meetings. More hobnobbing. One meeting led to us to hooking up with apitching a show at SyFy (it didn’t sell, but hey, we pitched it!) Then, on the strength of a project that still hasn’t gotten off the ground, we were asked to write a take for a tv movie. The producer liked our take and paid us to write a treatment! We don’t know if the movie is a go yet, but PAID TO WRITE….

But no WGA membership yet.

So, the 2015 goals. You know they are lofty. Ambitious. But we are determined, my sister and me. We can’t be bargained with. We can’t be reasoned with. We don’t feel pity, or remorse, or fear. And we absolutely will not stop, ever, until… we are staffed.

Staffing. WGA. Let’s go, 2015. We’re ready.

Posted under randomness, writing

This post was written by Shawna on January 2, 2015

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